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Thread: Fishing Facts

  1. #1
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    Fishing Facts

    U.S. Fishing Facts

    A look at the numbers



    Participation:
    44.4 million Americans ages 7 and older fish2 (An estimated 50 million fish including all age groups).

    One out of every six U.S. residents 16 and older fish. 1

    25 percent of U.S. males fish, and 8 percent of U.S. females fish. 1

    Excluding those who fished the Great Lakes, freshwater anglers account for 82 percent of all anglers.1

    Anglers spend an average of 16 days fishing and take an average of 13 fishing trips annually.1

    Anglers 16 and older took 365 million freshwater fishing trips in 2001 totaling 467 million days. Including saltwater anglers, 437 million fishing trips totaling 557 million days were taken. 1

    From 1991 to 1996, freshwater fishing days rose 13 percent. 6

    The average number of freshwater fishing days per angler increased from 14.3 in 1991 to 16.7 in 1996. 6

    Between 1980 and 1995, the number of Americans who fished increased 16 percent. 7

    Residents of the South provided the biggest increase in fishing (21 percent) in the United States between 1980 and 1995. 7

    The number of males fishing increased 14 percent from 1980 to 1995. 7


    Popularity:
    Fishing ranks as the 4th most popular participation sport in the nation. It ranks ahead of bicycling, bowling, basketball, golf, jogging, baseball, softball, soccer, volleyball, tennis, football and skiing. Only walking, swimming and camping are more popular. 2

    More Americans fish than play golf and tennis combined. 2

    More Americans fish than play soccer and basketball. 2

    The number of youths ages 12 to 17 who participate in freshwater fishing increased 10.9 percent since 1991 to 4.5 million. During the same period, the number of youths ages 12 to 17 who play baseball decreased 15.4 percent to 4 million. Basketball, softball, tennis and volleyball participation declined between 2 and 46 percent. 2

    Fishing ranks as the 2nd most popular water-related outdoor sport in the United States. Swimming ranks 1st. 2

    Freshwater fishing ranks as one of the top-five participation sports in 7 states. Fishing in general (both freshwater and saltwater) ranks as one of the top-five participation sports in 18 states. 2

    Fishing is the No. 1 participation sport in Minnesota, Florida, New Jersey and North Carolina. 2



    Women and Minorities:
    11.9 million women 7 and older fish. That's more than the number who participate in jogging, basketball, volleyball, softball, golf or tennis. 2

    Freshwater fishing is the 10th most popular participation sport among women. 2

    26.8 percent of all anglers are female 2 (representing 8 percent of the U.S. female population). 1

    5 percent of all anglers are black (representing 7 percent of the black population). 1

    5 percent of all anglers are Hispanic (representing 7 percent of the Hispanic population). 1

    The number of women fishing increased 19 percent from 1980 to 1995 compared to 14 percent for males. 7

    The region that experienced the largest increase in the number of females fishing was the Northeast. 7

    Women spend on average $246 per year for trip-related fishing expenses and $70 per year on fishing equipment for a total of $3 billion. 5

    Hispanics fish at lower rates than African-Americans and women, but they spend, on average, more money - $434 per angler for trips and $154 for equipment. Hispanics spent a total of $696 million per year on fishing trips and equipment. 5

    Fishing equipment expenditures among African-American anglers increased 43 percent between 1991 and 1996. 5

    African-American anglers spend on average $324 per year for trip-related fishing expenses and $128 per year on fishing equipment for a total of $814 million. 5

    African-American anglers spend more days fishing (22 vs. 18) and take more trips (18 vs. 14), on average, than all anglers. 5

    64 percent of African-American anglers live in the South compared to 39 percent of all anglers. 5

    43 percent of female anglers live in the South. 5

    16 percent of African-American anglers live in the Midwest. 5

    26 percent of female anglers live in the Midwest. 5

    43 percent of Hispanic anglers live in the South. 5

    38 percent of Hispanic anglers live in the West compared to 20 percent of all anglers. 5

    The number of days fished by African-American anglers increased 72 percent between 1991 and 1996 compared to 22 percent for all anglers. 5

    The number of days fished by female anglers increased 15 percent between 1991 and 1996. 5

    The number of days fished by Hispanic anglers remained constant between 1991 and 1996, but fishing trip expenditures increased 50 percent during the same period. 5

    1.9 million persons 16 and older with disabilities took 33 million fishing trips in 2001, fishing for 41 million days.1


    Why People Fish:
    33 percent of anglers fish to relax. 3

    25 percent of anglers fish as a way of spending time with family and friends. 3

    65 percent of non-anglers and 88 percent of anglers say that being asked by a child would make them want to go fishing or make them want to fish more often. 3



    What People Fish For and Where They Fish:
    Bass fishing is the most popular type of fishing in the United States. 6

    38 percent of all freshwater anglers in the United States fish for black bass. 1

    28 percent of freshwater anglers fish for trout. 1

    28 percent of freshwater anglers fish for panfish. 1

    27 percent of freshwater anglers fish for catfish. 1

    Bass are sought on 36 percent of all freshwater fishing days. 1

    92 percent of freshwater anglers fish in their state of residence. 1

    23 percent of freshwater anglers fish out of state. 1

    85 percent of freshwater anglers fish in flat water, including ponds, lakes and reservoirs. 1

    44 percent of freshwater anglers fish rivers and streams. 1


    U.S. Anglers by Age Group:
    17 percent of 16-to 17-year-olds fish, comprising 4 percent of all anglers. 1

    13 percent of 18-to 24-year-olds fish, comprising 9 percent of all anglers. 1

    19 percent of 25-to 34-year-olds fish, comprising 19 percent of all anglers. 1

    21 percent of 35-to 44-year-olds fish, comprising 27 percent of all anglers. 1

    17 percent of 45-to 54-year-olds fish, comprising 20 percent of all anglers. 1

    16 percent of 55-to 64-year-olds fish, comprising 12 percent of all anglers. 1

    8 percent of 65+ year-olds fish, comprising 9 percent of all anglers. 1

    Fishing among 35- to 44-year-olds increased 60 percent between 1980 and 1995. It was the largest increase of any group. 7


    Where Anglers Live:
    40 percent of all anglers live in urban areas with populations of 1 million or more. 1

    20 percent of all anglers live in areas with populations of 250,000 to 999,999. 1

    Urban areas contributed 18 percent more anglers in 1995 compared to 1980. 7

    Rural areas contributed 13 percent more anglers in 1995 compared to 1980. 7

    The South's 30 percent increase in the number of anglers from urban areas between 1980 and 1995 was the largest of any region. 7

    39 percent of all anglers live in the South. 5

    27 percent of all anglers live in the Midwest. 5

    20 percent of all anglers live in the West. 5

    15 percent of all anglers live in the Northeast. 5


    Economic Impact of Fishing:
    Anglers spent $35.6 billion in 2001 to pursue their sport. They spent $14.7 billion for fishing trips, $17 billion for equipment, and $4 billion for licenses, stamps tags, land leasing and ownership, membership dues and contributions, and magazines. 1 If hypothetically ranked as a corporation, this revenue figure would put sport fishing at 32nd on the 2002 Fortune 500 list of America's largest companies. 4

    Total economic output generated by freshwater fishing in 2001 exceeded $74 billion, including the impact on retailers, suppliers of goods and services to retailers, wholesalers and manufacturers, plus the indirect and induced impacts resulting from these activities. Including saltwater fishing, economic output reached $116 billion. 4

    The average angler incurs $1,046 in fishing-related expenses. 1

    Freshwater fishing expenditures in 2001 generated more than $19.4 billion in wages. Including saltwater fishing, $30.1 billion in wages were generated (up 23 percent since 1991). 4

    683,892 full-time jobs exist due to freshwater fishing. Including saltwater fishing, the total exceeds 1 million (up 16 percent since 1991). 4

    $2.07 billion was spent on fishing tackle in 2001. 2

    Fishing tackle ranks 4th in terms of consumer expenditures for non-team sports equipment. Golf equipment ranks first followed by exercise equipment and firearms for hunting. 2

    Florida anglers spend more than $4 billion annually on fishing and related equipment. California and Texas anglers spend more than $2 billion. 4

    Angler expenditures exceed $1 billion in Michigan, Minnesota, New York, North Carolina and Wisconsin. 4

    Tax Revenue and Conservation:
    Sport fishing generated more than $1.9 billion in state sales taxes in 2001. 4

    In 2001, sport fishing generated more than $470 million in state income tax. 4

    Sport fishing generated more than $4.8 billion in federal income tax in 2001. 4

    In 1998, excise taxes applied to hunting, fishing and recreational shooting equipment and motorboat fuels provided more than $426 million to states for fish stocking, wildlife restoration and research, aquatic resource education, hunter education and other activities. 8


    Sources:
    1. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-associated Recreation.
    2. National Sporting Goods Association. Sports Participation in 2001.
    3. Future of Fishing project conducted by Responsive Management of Harrisonburg, Va.
    4. American Sportfishing Association. The 2001 Demographics and Economic Impact of Sport Fishing in the United States.
    5. Participation and Expenditure Patterns of African-American, Hispanic, and Women Hunters and Anglers. Addendum to the 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation.
    6. Black Bass Fishing in the U.S. Addendum to the 1996 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation.
    7. 1980-1995 Participation in Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife Watching. National and Regional Demographic Trends.
    8. Sport Fish and Wildlife Restoration Web site, restorewildlife.org.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Master in FishingTX BIGDAVE's Avatar
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    Good post Don! I know that I am at least six times above the average yearly fishing expenses stated. However, I can't help myself. I love to fish! It's also good to know that some of my money is going to some very good causes. Thanks again for sharing the information.
    IF You Don't Go, You Won't Know

  3. #3
    Registerd user Master in FishingTX dwaynez's Avatar
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    Great Post, very informative!

    I know i donate a lot to the numbers in your post
    Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
    -Mark Twain

  4. #4
    Thin Water Tracker
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    I know what you mean Dave I can't remember a that I hadn't had fishing on my mind. I can remeber when I was a kid to young to walk down to the bay I would be mud bug fishing in the yard with a hunk of bacon on a string.

  5. #5
    Registerd user Master in FishingTX dwaynez's Avatar
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    I used to fish the ditches around my house when the water was up catching crawfish with bacon or mini marshmallows
    Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
    -Mark Twain

  6. #6
    Thin Water Tracker
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    I had a borother in law from FL. he was like a kid at a B-day party for one of my girls. He had never seen some fish a mudbug hole he was like a kid try to fish them out of the hole in my dads back yard.

  7. #7
    Senior Member FishingTX Angler Supreme
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    As kids, we would catch big ol bull frogs in a neighbors pond. A plastic grub slowly pulled on top of the lily pads would result in a fantasic blowup.
    We caught more frogs than fish outta there.

  8. #8
    Thin Water Tracker
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    Here one about bull frogs. Back in 1980 I started at the plant I still work at today. back then there was only one unit with one operator per shift. Needless to say those grave yards were long. The unit was built on 1964 and it was in a big building the down spouts had rusted away long beofre I started there but the drainage system was left in the slab. that first spring I was making a round and noticed that in just about all off the 16 or so drain hole left from the down spouts had bull frogs in them. The building had big lights over just about every one of them. and if you been in plants is the spring time you know the crickets pop up one day and after week or so it look like every cricket for five miles around or having a party in the lights. Well I started feeding the frogs but dropping the crickets down the holes. I couldn't see the frogs with my flashlight but when I dropped the crickets they was swim around in the water for a few seconds and then BAM they were gone. Well on the second night of feeding I was cleaning a desk out we had replaced and found a safety pin. Well being the outdoors man I am that pin was soon shaped in to a hook and I had some Mono in my truck. I have to say hooking a BIG bullfrog three foot down in a 4X4 inch drain and getting him out isn't as EZ as it sounds there was a few thrown hook beofre I got it down in fact the first one just about spooded me before they threw the hook. Needless to say I got the hang of it and had a few frog legs for dinner each night before fishing the holes out.

  9. #9
    Senior Member FishingTX Angler Supreme
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    Feeding frogs is fun. When the june bugs hit full swing there are hundreds of frogs in my yard at night. The kids like to catch the bugs and feed the "friendly" frogs. The "friendly" frogs hang by the front door and like to hop on in when you open the door. Much to the delite of my wife. I heard that grubs are june bug larve. Not sure if this is true. Does anybody know?

  10. #10
    Thin Water Tracker
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    Yes thay was those brown spot you in yard in the early summer or from them.

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