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Thread: Fruit tree update...grafts, air layers, from seed

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    Senior Member Master in FishingTX jeremy86360's Avatar
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    Fruit tree update...grafts, air layers, from seed

    Ok, so I posted a while back on fruit tree propagation. Wanted to give an update. Remembering bigl fallen persimmon and some of Jackie's old posts. Anyhow, heres some updates. I'll post in individual posts below so the pics match the topic. Hope it works...
    Last edited by jeremy86360; 05-04-2019 at 04:50 PM.

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    Senior Member Master in FishingTX jeremy86360's Avatar
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    First up...peaches. One of my peaches from seed put on blooms this last year. Ended up with 126 peaches from it. Saved the seeds. Put them in potting soil and put in the lower door of the fridge. Planted close to 80 peach trees in pots this spring. So far about 60 look to be growing strong. No idea the variety. They are small, exceptionally sweet, and very much a freestone. They are small though and are more green and yellow than with a red/yellow skin.
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    Senior Member Master in FishingTX jeremy86360's Avatar
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    Next up....grafting japanese persimmons to wild persimmons. They key (I think) is to use dormant wood taken in february, and dont graft until the tree has leaves the size of a nickel or quarter which for us is around April 1. Also bark grafts seem to work the best. Better than cleft or whip grafts. I should have 18 or so trees that took this year. I put hachiya, tanenashi, and saigo graft wood on wild persimmons in the pasture (diospyros virginiana). The one pic where my hand is behind it is 26 days old from graft wood about the size of 2" of a pencil. It already had fruit on it I had to pluck off.
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    Senior Member Master in FishingTX jeremy86360's Avatar
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    I also did some grafts to put methley and santa rosa plums on a wild rootstock plum that always suckers new trees for me to graft to. Plums need the warmth to heal up, so don't run out march 15t and do them.



    As a side note...I am trying several varieties of table grapes onto mustang grapes. So far no leaf buds. I was told they were too far apart genetically but figured I would try. I also took some softwood cuttings about a week ago so we will see it that works.
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    Senior Member Master in FishingTX jeremy86360's Avatar
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    Air layering works great on pears. I did these from trees that I air layered from my parents 30 year old pear tree. Good pears. Blight resistant. Just ring an inch of bark about a half inch or so limb. Peel that ring of bark off. Wrap the exposed portion of the limb with moist potting soil and wrap with bread bag. Tape both ends. Wrap with foil to keep light out. Rooting hormone can help but isnt necessary. Once roots form, just cut off and plant. I have 8 pear trees I put in the ground as air layers 3 years ago. All producing now. Walmart sacks full of pears.

    As a side note...air layering jujubes works to as I have done it. And since its not grafted.....wont shoot up root suckers. Last pic is of a jujube I planted from an air layer. Already making fruit.

    Another side note....seeds from grocery store oranges planted directly in potting soil work great as sour orange root stock for sweet oranges. I have about 7 or 8 that look like they are taking. Modified bud grafts seem to work better than T budding. Cleft also works well.

    Welp thats it for now. If I get time I will update things as they grow.
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    Senior Administrator Master in FishingTX Gentleben's Avatar
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    Ok that is simply awesome, so how did you learn the art of grafting or is it a gift ??
    Make AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!!

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    Senior Member Master in FishingTX jeremy86360's Avatar
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    Just trial and error....mostly error....Haha. it really has to do more with timing and only a little with technique. It sure is fun though and nice to have lots of good fruit trees.

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    Senior Member Master in FishingTX AthensMike's Avatar
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    Nice work. Very impressive.
    It's knowin' that your door is always open sideways and your path is free to walk......

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    Senior Administrator Master in FishingTX Gentleben's Avatar
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    no doubt very immpressive !!
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    Senior Member Master in FishingTX jeremy86360's Avatar
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    Thanks yall. I've got about 60 trees now in a little fenced in orchard in the pasture. They have been in the ground about three years now. Pears are the fastest growing and producing. Plums and growing fast...but late freezes and lack of multiple types has kept it down to a handful of fruit. Persimmons are doing great. Cant wait to get them going. Peaches...make sure to plant on a hill or a slope. The soil has to drain or they die. Pears can handle damp roots. My soil is to alkaline for blueberries. Jujubes I have a feeling will be the best producers and most consistent. They are drought tolerant and are blooming g right now after all the freezes. Figs....they need to be by an eve of a house where they can get plenty of water. And shade. Full sun and they struggle. I have a couple apple trees just for grins...only a year old. Time will tell if they dont get cotton root rot or blight. Loquats trees grow fast and well. They bloom a little early and need a no hard freeze. All trial and error I guess. At least I know how to make more before they croak

    I sure am going to make the coons and birds happy in a couple more years...lol

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